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Features
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Insights & Definitions
Brand
Brand

Brands help you identify specific solutions that you will or will not consider. Brand is also a good indication of whether the product is focused on business users or consumers.

The number of solutions that a vendor has within a specific product category can indicate their commitment to, and corresponding success in, that market.

Another indication of vendor quality can be articles written and videos produced about specific products (use the "Articles & Videos" link on this page). Generally, such reviews are only provided for market leaders.

Price
Price
Quantity is the leading reason for vendors to discount their pricing. Quantity discounts are available to the pricing shown on the left. Enter the quantity you need here.

Price can be an indication of quality and value. Any vendor that charges more for a product than the marketplace is willing to pay will not remain in business, or at least in that market, for very long.

The price actually paid for a product is usually driven by available budget, but specific feature requirements can sometimes command a higher price.

Minimum Rating
Rating

Ratings have become very important in product and service evaluation. They can help you avoid a bad choice or they can eliminate any potential doubts you may have and help you with your selection.

Currently about 61% of prospective buyers check for ratings and read online reviews (use the "Articles & Videos" link on this page) before making a purchase decision.

Many products have no ratings. Products without ratings generally mean either the product is relatively new or has not gained much traction in the marketplace. Although, that should not necessarily disqualify a solution from consideration.

WiFi Standards
WiFi Standards

WiFi or Wireless LAN (WLAN) standards are compatibility standards developed by the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE). They are also referred to as 802.11 standards.

The current standards are:

802.11a

802.11a supports bandwidth up to 54 Mbps and signals in a regulated frequency spectrum around 5 GHz. Because there is less interference in the 5GHz spectrum, 802.11a is often used in "noisy" electrical environments, such as hospitals. This higher frequency compared to 802.11b shortens the range of 802.11a networks. The higher frequency also means 802.11a signals have more difficulty penetrating walls and other obstructions.

802.11a has a fast maximum speed and its regulated frequencies prevent signal interference from other devices. But 802.11a has a higher cost and a shorter range signal that is more easily obstructed

802.11b

802.11b supports bandwidth up to 11 Mbps, comparable to traditional Ethernet. 802.11b uses the unregulated radio signaling frequency (2.4 GHz) as vendors often prefer using this frequency to lower their production costs. Being unregulated, 802.11b gear can incur interference from microwave ovens, cordless phones, and other appliances using the same 2.4 GHz range. However, by installing 802.11b gear a reasonable distance from other appliances, interference can easily be avoided.

802.11b provides for the lowest cost, a good signal range, and it is not easily obstructed by walls, ceilings, etc. But it also has the slowest maximum speed of any of the 802.11 standards and home appliances may interfere with it.

802.11g

802.11g supports bandwidth up to 54 Mbps and it uses the 2.4 GHz frequency for greater range. 802.11g is also backwards compatible with 802.11b, meaning that 802.11g access points will work with 802.11b wireless network adapters and vice versa.

802.11g has a fast maximum speed with good signal range that is not easily obstructed.
But 802.11g costs more than 802.11b and appliances may interfere with it.

802.11n

802.11n, also called "Wireless N", supports up to 300 Mbps of network bandwidth. 802.11n also offers somewhat better range over earlier WiFi standards due to its increased signal intensity, and it is backward-compatible with 802.11b/g gear. It increases the amount of bandwidth supported by utilizing multiple wireless signals and antennas (called MIMO technology) instead of one.

802.11n has a faster maximum speed and best signal range. It is also more resistant to signal interference from outside sources. But it costs more than 802.11g and its use of multiple signals may interfere with nearby 802.11b/g based networks.

802.11ac

802.11ac is the newest generation of WiFi signaling in popular use. Its network bandwidth is rated up to 1300 Mbps on the 5 GHz band plus up to 450 Mbps on 2.4 GHz. 802.11ac utilizes dual band wireless technology, supporting simultaneous connections on both the 2.4 GHz and 5 GHz WiFi bands. 802.11ac offers backward compatibility to 802.11b/g/n.

802.11ac has a fastest maximum speed and best signal range. It costs more than 802.11n and its use of multiple signals and dual frequencies may interfere with nearby 802.11a/b/g/n based networks.

Transmission Speed
Transmission Speed

Wireless Transmission Speed is the speed at which data is sent from a wireless router to a client device, such as a laptop computer. The speed is expressed in terms of Mbps (megabits per second).

Vendors advertise the maximum speeds possible. Actual speeds realized will be affected the distance and obstructions between the wireless router and client device. One thing to keep in mind is a wireless router can't go any faster than your Internet connection allows.
Wireless Transmission Speed varies by standard:

  • 802.11b 11 Mbps
  • 802.11a 54 Mbps
  • 802.11g 54 Mbps
  • 802.11n 300 Mbps
  • 802.11ac 1300 Mbps (5 GHz band) plus 450 Mbps (2.4 GHz band)

Speeds listed outside of these rates are likely non-standard speeds, meaning that you will need equipment from the same vendor for both ends of the wireless connection (i.e. Wireless Router at one end and a wireless access card inside a computer at the other).

Power over Ethernet (PoE) Supported
Power over Ethernet (PoE) Supported

Most Ethernet ports (typically RJ-45 ports) provide for data connections only.

Power over Ethernet (PoE) ports (also RJ-45 ports) pass electrical power along with data on Ethernet cabling. This allows a single cable to provide both data connection and electrical power to devices such as wireless access points or IP cameras.

Ethernet Technology
Ethernet Technology

Ethernet is a local area network (LAN) technology. The Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE) created the standard which they call 802.3. An Ethernet LAN typically connects via special grades of copper wires.

Wireless Routers usually have an Ethernet port or ports to connect them to the LAN. The speed of that connection is determined by the type of Ethernet connection used. Those types are:

Ethernet, also known as 10BASE-T, which provides transmission speeds up to 10 Mbps.

Fast Ethernet, or 100BASE-T, provides faster transmission speeds up to 100 megabits per second.

Gigabit Ethernet or 1000BASE-T provides an even faster transmission, at speeds up to 1000 megabits per second (1 gigabit or 1 billion bits per second).

10-Gigabit Ethernet is currently the fastest commercially available version which provides up to 10 billion bits per second.

WAN Connections
WAN Connections

Routers have a WAN connection, often a physical port, which is the connection point for connecting to the Internet. Common WAN connections are:

ADSL (RJ-11) - ADSL (Asymmetric Digital Subscriber Line) is a technology for transmitting digital information at a high bandwidth on existing phone lines to homes and businesses. ADSL provides continuously-available, "always on" connection and usually is connected by an RJ-11 port.

Ethernet (RJ-45) - Ethernet is a local area network (LAN) technology. With a router it would connect to another device would in turn make the connection to the Internet. An Ethernet LAN typically connects via special grades of copper wires and RJ-45 ports.

Mobile network (SIM) – the subscriber identification module (SIM) port is the port designed to hold the SIM card (for authorization) on mobile telephony devices (such as mobile phones and computers). It allows the router to connect to the Internet over a cellular network.

Mobile network (USB) - the Universal Serial Bus (USB) port, was designed to standardize the connection on mobile telephony devices (such as mobile phones and computers). It allows the router to connect to the Internet over a cellular network.

WiFi - WiFi (or Wi-Fi) is a technology that allows electronic devices to connect to a wireless LAN (WLAN) network. With a router, as a WAN connection, it would connect to another device would in turn make the connection to the Internet.

Mobile Networks
Mobile Networks

Mobile Networks are often described by the "generation" of technology deployed and the transmission technology used. The most widespread combination in North America is a 4G LTE network, which is faster than its predecessors. However other (older) technologies are widespread throughout the rest of the world.

2G - 2G (or 2-G) is short for second-generation wireless telephone technology, which is when radio signals on mobile networks changed from analog to digital. 2G has been superseded by newer, faster technologies such as 3G and 4G; however, 2G networks are still used in most parts of the world.

3G - 3G, short form of third generation, is the third generation of mobile telecommunications technology. It is faster than 2G technology as it provides an information transfer rate of at least 200 Kbit/s.

4G - 4G, short for fourth generation, is the fourth generation of mobile telecommunications technology, succeeding 3G. 4G service can have transfer rates of 100 Mbit/s for high mobility communication (i.e. cars) and 1 Gbit/s for low mobility communication (i.e. stationary users).

CDMA - Code division multiple access (CDMA) is a channel access method used by various radio communication technologies, like mobile networks. It was originally deployed on 2G networks.

EDGE - Enhanced Data rates for GSM Evolution (EDGE) is a digital mobile phone technology that allows improved data transmission rates as a backward-compatible extension of GSM. It was originally deployed on 2.5G networks. It increased typical transfer rates to 400 Kbit/s.

EVDO - Evolution-Data Optimized (EV-DO, EVDO) is a telecommunications standard for the wireless transmission of data through radio signals, typically for broadband Internet access. It supports high data rates and can be deployed alongside a wireless carrier's voice services, but has been largely discontinued in favor of LTE.

GPRS - General Packet Radio Service (GPRS) is a packet oriented mobile data service on the 2G and 3G cellular GSM networks.

GSM - GSM (Global System for Mobile Communications), is a standard to describe the protocols for 2G and 3G digital cellular networks used by mobile phones. As of 2014 it has become the default global standard for mobile communications, with over 90% market share, operating in over 219 countries and territories.

HSDPA - High Speed Downlink Packet Access (HSDPA) is an enhanced 3G (third-generation) mobile communications protocol in the High-Speed Packet Access (HSPA) family, which allows for higher data speeds and capacity.

HSPA - High Speed Packet Access (HSPA) is a combination of two mobile protocols, High Speed Downlink Packet Access (HSDPA) and High Speed Uplink Packet Access (HSUPA), that extends and improves the performance of existing 3G mobile telecommunication networks utilizing the WCDMA protocols.

HSPA+ - Evolved High Speed Packet Access, or HSPA+, is a technical standard for wireless, broadband telecommunication. It is the second phase of HSPA. HSPA+ can achieve data rates of up to 42.2 Mbit/s.

HSUPA - High-Speed Uplink Packet Access (HSUPA) is a 3G mobile telephony protocol in the HSPA family. This technology to improve the uplink data rate to 5.76 Mbit/s, extending the capacity, and reducing latency.

LTE - LTE (Long-Term Evolution, commonly marketed as 4G LTE) is a standard for wireless communication of high-speed data for mobile phones and data terminals. It is based on the GSM/EDGE and UMTS/HSPA network technologies, increasing the capacity and speed using a different radio interface together with core network improvements. During the ongoing development process of the 4G technology LTE has become a sole upgrade path for all wireless networks.

UMTS - The Universal Mobile Telecommunications System (UMTS) is a third generation mobile cellular system for networks based on the GSM standard. UMTS uses wideband code division multiple access (W-CDMA) radio access technology to offer greater spectral efficiency and bandwidth to mobile network operators.

WCDMA - W-CDMA or WCDMA (Wideband Code Division Multiple Access) is an air interface standard found in 3G mobile telecommunications networks. It supports conventional cellular voice, text and MMS services, but can also carry data at high speeds, allowing mobile operators to deliver higher bandwidth applications including streaming and broadband Internet access.

WiMAX - WiMAX (Worldwide Interoperability for Microwave Access) is a family of wireless communications standards initially designed to provide 30 to 40 megabit-per-second data rates. WiMAX refers to interoperable implementations of the IEEE 802.16 family of wireless-networks standards ratified by the WiMAX Forum.

Number of Antennas
Number of Antennas

Some Wireless Routers use more than one antenna due to using multiple frequencies (2.4GHz and 5 GHz). For instance, 802.11g routers use only the 2.4 GHz frequency. So they only need 1 antenna. 802.11n routers use 2 frequencies, 2.4 & 5 GHz and transmit data on both. To cover the different frequencies, they need at least one antenna for each frequency (so a minimum of two).

Other Wireless Routers will use more than one antenna to increase the signal strength, which gives the router a larger receiving range. This can be used to help with interference reduction. If you have a problem with weak signal strength, then multiple antennas may help. The majority of 802.11b/g Wireless Routers have two antennas to improve signal strength.

Finally, some Wireless Routers use multiple antennas to increase throughput. Newer 802.11n and 802.11ac routers use multiple antennas to implement MIMO (multiple input, multiple output) technology, to add signals or "spatial streams" together to increase transmission speed. A 2x2 wireless router, for example can transmit/receive two "spatial streams" at the same time.

Basically the more antennas, the better and faster your wireless connection will likely be. The trade-off is in the cost.

Number of USB Ports
Number of USB Ports

Universal Serial Bus (USB) is an industry standard that defines the cables and communications protocols used for connection, communication, and power supply between computing and electronic devices.

A USB port built into a Wireless Router allows it to share the USB connection with any device that has access to the network, and this can be useful for a variety of reasons. From flash keys to portable hard drives to desktop computers, it can give you access to USB devices that aren't otherwise attached to your network. USB storage is one scenario for sharing one connection with many users.

USB Version
USB Version

Universal Serial Bus (USB) is an industry standard that defines the cables and communications protocols used for connection, communication, and power supply between computing and electronic devices.

1.1 - USB 1.1, released in August 1998, specified data rates up to 12 Mbit/s.

2.0 - USB 2.0 was released in April 2000, adding a higher data rate of 480 Mbit/s. However, due to bus access constraints, the effective throughput is limited to 280 Mbit/s. The USB 2.0 specification also included Mini-A and Mini-B Connectors.

3.0 - USB 3.0 specification was released in November 2008. The new SuperSpeed mode provides a data rate of 5.0 Gbit/s. Communication is full-duplex in SuperSpeed transfer mode; earlier modes are half-duplex.

Standard Memory
Standard Memory

Standard Memory is the amount of Random Access Memory (RAM) that ships with the Router. RAM is very fast memory that loses its information when the router is shutdown or restarted. On a router, RAM is used to hold the operating system, system tables, and buffers. RAM is also used to store routing tables, keep ARP cache, and performs packet buffering (shared RAM).

Additional RAM on a router adds more room to prevent network congestion and improves throughput. This is particularly useful if you need to store large routing tables. Home or branch routers typically have RAM measured in megabytes (MBs), while enterprise routers will have RAM measured in the gigabytes (GBs).

Flash Memory
Flash Memory

Flash Memory is a very popular non-volatile, rewritable memory chip used for storage. Most routers do not have hard drives. They use flash memory for similar purposes of storing programs and data, even when the system is off (non-volatile memory). On a router, Flash Memory typically contains the full operating system and system configuration. This allows you to upgrade the OS without removing chips.

Additional Flash Memory on a router improves performance. Home or branch routers typically have Flash Memory measured in megabytes (MBs), while enterprise routers will have RAM measured in the gigabytes (GBs).

Firmware Upgradeable
Firmware Upgradeable

Firmware is a type of software that provides control, monitoring and data manipulation in network and computing products and systems. The firmware contained in these devices provides the low-level control program for the device. Firmware is held in non-volatile memory devices such as ROM, EPROM, or flash memory.

If the firmware is upgradable, it means that the firmware can be updated to fix problems or add features to the device.

Rack Mountable
Rack Mountable

Rack Mountable refers to the ability of a server, router, network switch or other similar device to be mounted in a standard 19-inch equipment rack or a 23-inch equipment rack. This is desirable when equipment density, environmental controls, or uninterruptable power is a concern.

Rack Unit (RU)
Rack Unit (RU)

Number of Rack Units describes the amount of space a device will take inside of an equipment rack. A rack unit is a unit of measure used to describe the height of a server, router, network switch or other similar device mounted in a standard 19-inch rack or a 23-inch rack. One rack unit is 44.45 mm (1.75 in) high.

One rack unit is commonly designated as "1U"; similarly, 2 rack units are "2U" and so on. The size of a piece of rack mounted equipment is usually described as a number in "U". One rack unit is also sometimes referred to as "1RU". The more "U"s a device requires, the more space it will require.

Routing Protocols
Routing Protocols

A routing protocol specifies how routers communicate with each other, they enable selection of routes between any two nodes on a computer network. The leading routing protocols are:

BGP - Border Gateway Protocol (BGP) is an exterior protocol designed to exchange routing and reachability information between autonomous systems (AS) on the Internet. Typically used by carriers and very large enterprises.

EIGRP - Enhanced Interior Gateway Routing Protocol (EIGRP) is an advanced version of IGRP. It is a distance vector interior routing protocol. It is used by routers to exchange routing data within an autonomous system. EIGRP is a Cisco proprietary protocol and used by many enterprises.

HSRP - Hot Standby Routing Protocol (HSRP) is a Cisco proprietary redundancy protocol for establishing a fault-tolerant default gateway.

IGRP - Interior Gateway Routing Protocol (IGRP) is a distance vector interior routing protocol. It is used by routers to exchange routing data within an autonomous system. IGRP is a Cisco proprietary protocol, but has been largely replaced by EIGRP.

IP - IP (Internet Protocol) routing is a process used to determine which path a packet or datagram can be sent. The process uses routing information to make decisions and is designed to send a packet over multiple networks.

IS-IS - Intermediate System to Intermediate System (IS-IS) is designed to move information efficiently within a computer network, a group of physically connected computers or similar devices.

MPLS - Multiprotocol Label Switching (MPLS) is a data-carrying technique for high-performance telecommunications networks that uses short path labels rather than long network addresses, avoiding complex lookups in a routing table.

OSPF - Open Shortest Path First (OSPF) uses a link state routing algorithm and is an interior routing protocol, operating within a single autonomous system (AS).

RIP-1 - The Routing Information Protocol (RIP) is one of the oldest distance-vector routing protocols which employ the hop count as a routing metric. Originally published in 1988 it uses classful routing.

RIP-2 - RIP version 2 (RIPv2) was developed in 1993, due to the deficiencies of the original RIP specification. It included the ability to carry subnet information, thus supporting Classless Inter-Domain Routing (CIDR).

Quality of Service (QoS) Support
Quality of Service (QoS) Support

Quality of Service (QoS) refers to a network device's ability to achieve maximum bandwidth and deal with other network performance elements like latency, error rate and uptime. Often important for voice and video applications running over the Internet, QOS can also prioritize mission critical applications ahead of non-critical applications.

VoIP Supported
VoIP Supported

Voice over IP (also called VoIP, IP Telephony, and Internet Telephony) refers to the set of technologies that enable the routing of voice communications over the Internet or a computer network.

If a Router has VoIP Support then in addition to handling digital data networking, it can also provide voice services. These types of units may be referred to as Integrated Services Routers (ISRs).

Firewall
Firewall

A firewall capability is a network security safeguard, either hardware or software-based, that controls incoming and outgoing network traffic based on a set of rules.

Security Features
Security Features

Security Features include widely used data encryption, user authentication, and network access standards.

AES – also known as Advanced Encryption Standard, is a symmetric block cipher used by the U.S. government to protect classified information and is implemented in software and hardware throughout the world to encrypt sensitive data.

EAP - Extensible Authentication Protocol is an authentication framework frequently used in wireless networks and point-to-point connections.

DES – also known as Data Encryption Standard, a popular symmetric-key encryption method developed in 1975 and standardized by ANSI in 1981 as ANSI X.3.92. DES uses a 56-bit key and uses the block cipher method, which breaks text into 64-bit blocks and then encrypts them.

FIPS - Federal Information Processing Standards are a set of standards that describe document processing, encryption algorithms and other information technology standards for use within non-military government agencies and by government contractors and vendors who work with the agencies.

LEAP - Lightweight Extensible Authentication Protocol (LEAP) is a proprietary wireless LAN authentication method developed by Cisco Systems.

MD5 - is a message-digest algorithm widely used cryptographic hash function (which maps digital data of arbitrary size to digital data of fixed size). MD5 has been utilized in a wide variety of cryptographic applications, and is also commonly used to verify data integrity.

PEAP - Protected Extensible Authentication Protocol is a version of EAP, designed to provide more secure authentication for 802.11 WLANs (wireless local area networks) that support 802.1X port access control.

RADIUS - Remote Authentication Dial-In User Service (RADIUS) is a network protocol that provides security to networks against unauthorized access. RADIUS secures a network by enabling centralized authentication of dial-in users and authorizing their access to use a network service.

SHA-1 - is a cryptographic hash function (which maps digital data of arbitrary size to digital data of fixed size) designed by the United States National Security Agency and is a U.S. Federal Information Processing Standard.

SSH - also known as Secure Socket Shell, is a network protocol that provides administrators with a secure way to access a remote computer.

SSL - Secure Sockets Layer (SSL, but sometimes called HTTPS or Hypertext Transport Protocol Secure) is the standard security technology for establishing an encrypted link between a web server and a browser. This link ensures that all data passed between the web server and browsers remain private and integral.

SSID - Service Set Identifier (SSID), commonly called the "wireless network name", filtering is an example of MAC filtering whereby the SSID is used to determine access to the network and its data.

TKIP - Temporal Key Integrity Protocol is an encryption protocol included as part of the IEEE 802.11i standard for wireless LANs (WLANs). It was designed to provide more secure encryption than WEP, the original WLAN security protocol.

Twofish - is an encryption algorithm based on an earlier algorithm, Blowfish (see above), and was a finalist for a NIST Advanced Encryption Standard (AES) algorithm to replace the DES algorithm.

WEP - Wired Equivalent Privacy (WEP) is a security protocol, specified in the IEEE Wireless Fidelity (Wi-Fi) standard, 802.11b, that is designed to provide a wireless local area network (WLAN) with a level of security and privacy comparable to what is usually expected of a wired LAN.

WPA - Wi-Fi Protected Access is a security protocol and security certification program developed by the Wi-Fi Alliance to secure wireless computer networks. The Alliance defined these in response to serious weaknesses researchers had found in the previous system, WEP (see above).

WPA2 - Wi-Fi Protected Access 2, the follow on security method to WPA for wireless networks that provides stronger data protection and network access control. WPA2 provides government grade security by implementing the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) FIPS 140-2 compliant AES encryption algorithm and 802.1x-based authentication.

WPS - Wi-Fi Protected Setup (originally Wi-Fi Simple Config) is a network security standard to create a secure wireless home network.

Filtering Technologies
Filtering Technologies

Filters allow you to exclude some portion of available network data (web traffic, ftp traffic, etc.). Typically used to protect the user from viruses, data leakage, and inappropriate content (such as adult themed websites).

ACL - ACL (Access Control List) filtering blocks data streams by TCP port number, such as blocking HTTP traffic (web traffic) flowing over port 80. It is a type of Port Filtering.

Client - Client-side software filtering is used when you want to offload the overhead of retrieving data from a service endpoint.

Domain - Domain filtering allows filtering via a whitelist or blacklist based on a web domain (such as abc.com). This is less granular than Web or URL filtering which can filtered at an individual page level.

IP - IP filtering allows filtering via a whitelist or blacklist based on a web IP address (such as 192.168.1.1). This is more granular than a domain filter which can only filter an entire site as opposed to a single page.

MAC - MAC Filtering (or GUI filtering, or layer 2 address filtering) refers to a security access control method whereby an address assigned to each network card is used to determine access to the network and its data.

Packet - Packet filtering is a firewall technique used to control network access by monitoring outgoing and incoming packets and allowing them to pass or halt based on the source and destination Internet Protocol (IP) addresses, protocols and ports.

Port - Port filtering is the practice of selectively enabling or disabling Transmission Control Protocol (TCP) ports and User Datagram Protocol (UDP) ports on computers or network devices. ACL filtering is one type of port filtering.

Protocol - Protocol filtering is the practice of selectively blocking or passing Transmission Control Protocol (TCP) data and User Datagram Protocol (UDP) data on computers or network devices based on the data's transport protocol. Protocol examples would include HTTP, HTTPS, FTP, SMTP, POP, etc.

SSID - Service Set Identifier (SSID), commonly called the "wireless network name", filtering is an example of MAC filtering whereby the SSID is used to determine access to the network and its data.

TCP - TCP filtering is the practice of selectively enabling or disabling Transmission Control Protocol (TCP) ports and/or protocols on computers or network devices.

UDP - UDP filtering is the practice of selectively enabling or disabling User Datagram Protocol (UDP) ports and/or protocols on computers or network devices.

Web - Web filtering is also known as URL filtering. It allows filtering via a whitelist or blacklist of websites from any web address (or URL) such as http://www.abc.com/news.html. This is more granular than a domain filter which can only filter an entire site as opposed to a single page.

DHCP Server
DHCP Server

The Dynamic Host Configuration Protocol (DHCP) is a standardized network protocol used on Internet Protocol (IP) networks for dynamically distributing network configuration parameters, such as IP addresses and DNS servers for networked devices.

When a device has a DHCP Server, it means the device can send network settings automatically to other devices on the same network, reducing the need for a network administrator or a user to configure those devices manually.

DHCP Client
DHCP Client

The Dynamic Host Configuration Protocol (DHCP) is a standardized network protocol used on Internet Protocol (IP) networks for dynamically distributing network configuration parameters, such as IP addresses and DNS servers for networked devices.

When a device has a DHCP Client, it means the device can receive its network settings automatically, reducing the need for a network administrator or a user to configure these settings manually.

Web-based Management
Web-based Management

A device (switches, routers, or wireless access points) with an embedded web-based interface that allows users to manage the device from anywhere on the network through a standard browser.

Power Consumption
Power Consumption

Power consumption refers to the electrical energy required to operate an electrical device. Generally expressed in watts, power consumption is important for data center deployments or anywhere that electrical availability is a concern.

Certification
Certification

Certifications for wireless routers address electromagnetic interference and compatibility, restrict the use of hazdardous substances in their construction and manage their disposal, certify their safety, and show their compliance to networking and encryption standards. The leading certifications include:

FCC Part 15 - USA standard which regulates unlicensed radio-frequency transmissions, both intentional and unintentional.

IEC EN61000 - International Electrotechnical Commission's standards for electromagnetic compatibility.

EN 55 022 - European limits and methods of measurement of radio disturbance characteristics of information technology equipment.

CISPR22 - Comité International Spécial des Perturbations Radio's standards for radio disturbance characteristics.

ICES-003 - Interference-Causing Equipment Standard that sets out standard requirements for information technology equipment.

AS/NZS - Standards Australia limits on radio disturbance characteristics of information technology equipment.

CE Mark - a mandatory conformity marking for products sold within the European Economic Area.

RoHS - Directive by the European Union on the restriction of the use of certain hazardous substances in electrical and electronic equipment.

WEEE - Waste Electrical and Electronic Equipment Directive on waste electrical and electronic equipment.

UL - Underwriter's Labrotory's product saftey certification.

Wi-Fi (or WiFi) - is a local area wireless computer networking technology that allows electronic devices to connect to the network, based on the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers' (IEEE) 802.11 standards.

WPA - Wi-Fi Protected Access is a security protocol and security certification program developed by the Wi-Fi Alliance to secure wireless computer networks. It was developed to replace the now outdated WEP (Wired Equivalent Privacy) standard.

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