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Features
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Insights & Definitions
Brand
Brand

Brands help you identify specific solutions that you will or will not consider. Brand is also a good indication of whether the product is focused on business users or consumers.

The number of solutions that a vendor has within a specific product category can indicate their commitment to, and corresponding success in, that market.

Another indication of vendor quality can be articles written and videos produced about specific products (use the "Articles & Videos" link on this page). Generally, such reviews are only provided for market leaders.

Price
Price
Quantity is the leading reason for vendors to discount their pricing. Quantity discounts are available to the pricing shown on the left. Enter the quantity you need here.

Price can be an indication of quality and value. Any vendor that charges more for a product than the marketplace is willing to pay will not remain in business, or at least in that market, for very long.

The price actually paid for a product is usually driven by available budget, but specific feature requirements can sometimes command a higher price.

Minimum Rating
Rating

Ratings have become very important in product and service evaluation. They can help you avoid a bad choice or they can eliminate any potential doubts you may have and help you with your selection.

Currently about 61% of prospective buyers check for ratings and read online reviews (use the "Articles & Videos" link on this page) before making a purchase decision.

Many products have no ratings. Products without ratings generally mean either the product is relatively new or has not gained much traction in the marketplace. Although, that should not necessarily disqualify a solution from consideration.

Operating System
Operating System

The Operating System (OS) is the software that manages the computer's hardware and software resources and provides common services for the applications you use. The user interface (the overall design of what you see on the screen, and the way that you interact with the computer) is also determined by the operating system.

Most of today's PCs run on one of four operating system platforms: Chrome OS, Linux, Mac OS X, or Windows. However, there are a few less widely-adopted operating systems (such as Chrome OS) availalble as well. Each of these operating systems has its own strengths and weaknesses, which should be taken into account when you are trying to decide which will best meet your needs.

Android was developed (and is still being updated and enhanced) by Google. Because Google released the Android source code under an open-source license, any tech-savvy company or individual can create a modified version of Android to meet their own need. This has lead to the widespread adoption of the Android OS by many vendors for use on a large number of devices. However, though you will have many more Android-based tablets to choose from than the other major platforms, this is not true for traditional PCs (which have very few devices running on Android).

Chrome OS is an operating system designed by Google (based on the Linux kernel) that uses the Google Chrome web browser as its primary user interface. Since Chrome OS was originally conceived as an operating system in which both applications and user data reside in the cloud, it primarily runs web applications. While the Chrome OS does have a media player and file manager, it provides little else in terms of integrated apps. Many observers have pointed out that it is not really an operating system in the true sense, since any web browser running on any operating system is functionally equivalent.

Linux was originally developed for personal computers based on the Intel x86 architecture under the model of free and open-source software development and distribution. It has since been ported to more platforms than any other operating system. Some advantages of Linux include: you don't have to ditch Windows or OS X because it easily supports dual-boot systems, it's very secure, and you're supporting open source and free software. On the other hand (although it is one of the most widely used operating systems world-wide), you will not find many laptops with it pre-installed out of the box.

Mac OS X is the current version of the Apple operating system for Mac computers (both desktop and laptop). As with everything from Apple, it is proprietary operating system designed specifically for Apple hardware, which means if you want MAC OS X you need to buy an Apple computer. Like all Apple operating systems, Mac OS X has an elegance to its look-and-feel that people tend to like. You will, however, pay a premium price for it. Apple computers, like all Apple products, fall in the upper range of the price spectrum. From a corporate security point of view, the Mac OS is known for being more secure than Microsoft Windows (although Apple computers are not as widely used in the business world as their Windows-based alternatives).

Windows was originally designed by Microsoft for use on desktop computers. While it is probably not as secure as Mac OS X or Linux, Microsoft has been providing business-targeted operating systems long enough to take security seriously. Like Apple with Mac OS X, Microsoft regularly pushes out updates and patches to all devices running the current version of Windows (as well as devices running Windows back to version Windows 7). Because it has long dominated the business market, almost all full-featured versions of common business software (such as the Microsoft Office Suite, Adobe Creative Suite, etc.) run natively on Windows-based PCs. Additionally, since Windows is not locked into a proprietary hardware manufacturer, you will find a larger selection of computers (from both a cost and a performance perspective) to choose from with Windows-based PCs than any of the other major operating systems.

Storage Capacity
Storage Capacity

Storage capacity refers to the amount of data you can store on a computers's hard disk or solid state drive. Typically your data includes the computers's operating system as well as the applications you've installed, music and video files, documents, images, etc.

Storage capacity is generally measured in gigabytes or terabytes (a terabyte is equal to 1024 gigabytes). When determing how much storage capacity you require, keep in mind the kinds of files you will be working with on your computer. Media files (such as music and video) generally take up much more storage space than your applications and document files. For example, a single video file (such as downloaded movie) can take four gigabytes of space or more.

Storage Type
Storage Type

Storage Type refers to the technology used to provide the storage capacity of a tablet. The four types of internal storage most commonly used in PCs are flash, hard-disk drives, hybrid (or fusion) drives, and solid-state drives. Each is described in more detail below.

Flash is a form of solid-state storage. It works by storing data using a charge on a capacitor to represent a bit. Unlike traditional hard-disk storage, there are no moving mechanical parts involved. Because flash storage has no moving parts, it uses less power than disk-based storage. This makes it an ideal type of storage for laptops and tablets, which are most often used un-plugged and running off their battery charge.

Hard-disk drives (HDD) are a data storage devices that store and retrieve digital information using one or more rigid, rapidly-rotating disks that are coated with magnetic material. Because of their mechanical nature, hard-disk drives tend to be larger, heavier, and require more power than solid-state storage devices. Also, because the magnetic disks are quite thin, they are more prone to damage if dropped. On the other hand, hard-disk drives are the least expensive storage type to manufacture. This means that PCs using HDD storage can provide more storage for less money than PCs using all solid-state storage.

Hybrid drives are a combination of solid-state storage and hard-disk storage. They store your most-often used data in the solid-state portion of the drive, and push the rest of the data onto the hard-disk portion. They are basically an attempt to combine the speed of solid-state with the lower cost of hard-disk technology. The term Fusion drive simply refers to an specific implementation of a hybrid drive that was developed by Apple.

Solid-state drives (SSD) use the same basic technology as flash devices. However, because of some small technical differences, solid-state drives in general tend to be of higher quality and more reliable than basic flash devices. For this reason, PCs and tablets at the high-end of the storage capacity range (more than 128GB), tend to be solid-state drives rather than basic flash.

Storage Drive Interface
Storage Drive Interface

SATA (Serial ATA) is a computer bus interface for connecting host bus adapters to mass storage devices such as hard disk drives, optical drives, and solid-state drives. The SATA interface was introduced in 2003.

SATA I (also referred to simply as SATA, but formally known as SATA 1.5Gb/s) is the first generation SATA interface running at 1.5 Gb/s. The bandwidth throughput supported by the SATA interface is up to 150MB/s.

SATA II (formally known as SATA 3Gb/s) is a second generation SATA interface running at 3.0 Gb/s. The bandwidth throughput supported by the SATA II interface is up to 300MB/s.

SATA III (formally known as SATA 6Gb/s) is a third generation SATA interface running at 6.0Gb/s. The bandwidth throughput supported by the SATA III interface is up to 600MB/s. This interface is backwards compatible with SATA II interface.

mSATA (Mini-SATA) was announced by the Serial ATA International Organization in 2009. Applications include netbooks, laptops and other devices that require a solid-state drive in a small footprint. The connector is similar in appearance to a PCI Express Mini Card interface, but is not electrically compatible because the data signals need a connection to the SATA host controller instead of the PCI Express host controller.

Standard Memory
Standard Memory

Standard Memory is the amount of Random Access Memory (RAM) that ships with the computer. RAM is very fast memory that loses its information when the computer is shutdown or restarted. On a computer, RAM is used to hold the operating system and provide the memory area to run your application software (such as your web browser, word processor, music player, etc.).

Additional RAM on a computer allows you to run more applications simultaneously and can also improve performace. Todays computers (whether designed for home, student, or business use) measure the amount of RAM in gigabytes (GBs).

Memory Type
Memory Type

SDRAM (Synchronous Dynamic Random Access Memory) began to appear in systems in late 1996. Unlike previous technologies, SDRAM was designed to synchronize itself with the timing of the CPU. This enabled the memory controller to know the exact clock cycle when the requested data will be ready, meaning the CPU no longer had to wait between memory accesses. The next generation of SDRAM was DDR (Double Data Rate), which doubled the transfer rate without increasing the frequency of the clock.

DDR2 SDRAM was the second generation of SDRAM to use the Double Data Rate technology. The primary benefit of DDR2 was its ability to operate the external data bus twice as fast as the first generation of DDR SDRAM.

DDR3 SDRAM (Double Data Rate 3rd generation SDRAM) reduced power consumption by 40% compared to DDR2 modules, which allowed for lower operating currents and voltages. It also added two functions, ASR (Automatic Self-Refresh) and SRT (Self-Refresh Temperature), which allows the memory to control the refresh rate according to the temperature variation.

DDR3L SDRAM is simply DDR3 SDRAM that was designed to work at a lower voltage consumption. DDR3 only runs at an operating voltage of 1.5v, while DDR3L can operate at both 1.35v and 1.25v. Theoretically this also makes the memory faster because the transition from a zero to a one state requires less voltage shift (i.e., it takes less time to go from zero to 1.25v than it does to go from zero to 1.5v.

LPDDR3 (Low Power DDR3) is a mobile DDR SDRAM standard, designed for mobile computing devices such as smart phones, tablets, and 2-in-1 hybrids. LPDDR3 chip design shares little in common with standard DDR3 memory. In addition to their lower power consumtion, the chips are smaller and use less board space than their non-mobile equivalents.

DDR4 SDRAM (Double Data Rate 4th generation SDRAM) provided for still a lower operating voltage (1.2V) and higher transfer rate. The DDR4 standard allows for memory chips of up to 64 GB in capacity, compared to DDR3's maximum of 16 GB per chip. DDR4 also added some functions, such as DBI (Data Bus Inversion), CRC (Cyclic Redundancy Check) and CA parity which enhance DDR4 memory's signal integrity and improve the stability of data transmission.

DDR4L SDRAM (like DDR3L was to DDR3) is just a newer version of the DDR4 chip that has been designed to operating at a lower voltage (1.05v).

Maximum Memory Supported
Maximum Memory Supported

Maximum memory supported is the total amount of Random Access Memory (RAM) a computer is able to use. RAM is used to hold the operating system and provide the memory area to run your applications software. Most computers are going to have 4 to 8 GB of RAM in a standard configuation, which is sufficient for general use. However, for resource intensive tasks (such as applications/database development, video editing, graphics design, or computer gaming), additional memory can significantly improve performance.

The amount of memory a computer can support depends on the number of memory slots (how many memory chips the computer can accomodate), and the type of compatible memory chips. Maximum memory is a combination of the memory chip size (1 GB chip, 2 GB chip, 4 GB chip, etc.) times the number of available slots.

Screen Size
Screen Size

The screen size for a computers is given as the diagonal measurement of the screen. If a computer's specification says that it has 15 inch screen, it means that the diagonal measurement (from one corner of the screen to the opposite corner) is 15 inches. When you measure a screen horizontally, it is referred to as the width. Measuring it vertically is referred to as the height.

When determining the diagonal screen size, make sure you are measuring only the screen itself and not the entire monitors's diagonal size (i.e., do not include the bezel around the screen or the monitor's casing).

Screen size is normally published in inches. However, in countries that use the metric system (such as most European countries and India), screen sizes are sometimes specified in centimeters. To convert centimeters into inches divide the centimeter value by 2.54.

Screen Resolution
Screen Resolution

For computers (as well as tablets and cell phones), resolution refers to the number of pixels contained on the display screen or monitor. The term 'pixels' means the individual points of color that make up the image on the screen. Screen resolution is expressed in terms of the number of pixels on the horizontal axis and the number on the vertical axis. For example, a resolution of 1600x900 means the screen has 1600 horizontal pixels and 900 vertical pixels. A higher pixel count means a higher resolution, which results in more information visible on the screen without scrolling.

Resolution also effects the sharpness (or clarity) of the image on the screen. However, the sharpness of the display depends on both the resolution and the screen size. For example, a resolution of 1600x900 will result in a sharper image on a 11 inch screen than it will on a 17 inch screen.

Also, if you plan on watching HD (high definition) movies or TV programming on your computer, you need to know that true HD requires a minimum resolution of 1920x1080. Lower resolution screens will still allow you to view the movie or program, but the image quality will not be as good as it would be on a true HD screen.

Aspect Ratio
Aspect Ratio

Aspect ratio refers to the relationship of the width of a video image compared to its height. The two most common aspect ratios are 4:3 (also known as fullscreen) and 16:9 (also known as widescreen).

The 4:3 aspect ratio was used on older TV's and the original CRT-based computer monitors and has basically a squarish shape. 4:3 LCD monitors can display analog video signals that conform to NTSC and PAL standards, but they are not capable of displaying HD video.

The 16:9 aspect ratio is used by most of today's high-definition LCD monitors and is nearly twice as wide as it high. 16:9 widescreen monitors are ideally suited to display HD video signals.

In addition, you will sometimes see displays listed with a 5:4 aspect ratio. This was used on many of the early LCD computer monitors before they changed over to the widescreen display common today.

Finally, you will see some displays listed with a 21:9 aspect ratio. This is the cinema standard at which most movies are filmed, and displays with 21:9 aspect ratio allow you to see the entire width of the movie as it was shown in the theater.

Touchscreen
Touchscreen

A touch screen is a computer display screen that is also an input device. Touch screens allow the user to interact with a computer by using their fingers on the screen itself, rather than by using a keyboard. Many newer laptops have touch screen displays to take advantage of the touch capabilities of operating systems such as Microsft's Windows 10. There are three types of touch screen technology:

Resistive: A resistive touch screen is coated with a thin metallic electrically conductive and resistive layer. Although resistive touch screens are generally more affordable, they do not provide the clarity of the other types. Additionally, the resistive layer can be easly damaged by sharp objects (although they are not affected by outside elements such as dust or water).

Surface wave: Surface wave technology uses ultrasonic waves that pass over the touch screen panel. Surface wave touch screens provide significantly better clarity than resistive screens. They also are the most advanced of the three types, but they can be damaged by outside elements.

Capacitive: A capacitive touch screen is coated with a material that stores electrical charges. Capacitive touch screens have high clarity, but they must be touched with a finger. Both resistive and surface wave panels can be used with either fingers or a stylus. Like resistive touch screens, capacitive touch screens are not affected by outside elements.

Processor Family
Processor Family

Processor Family refers to the both the manufacturer and model of a laptop's processor chip. Processors within a given family generally have similar feature sets. Although some inexpensive computers run on chips from smaller companies such as AMD or NVIDIA, the vast majority of today's computers (including both Apple and Windows-based machines) run on Intel processors.

However, you should keep in mind that Intel produces a wide variety processors. As a result, there can be a noticeable difference in both cost and processing power from one Intel chip to another.

The most common reasons for selecting a specific processsor family are compatibility (particularly for business computers that may have to adhere to company provided specifications) or when performance is a major requirement of the computer being purchased (for example, an Intel Core i7 chip is a significantly more powerful processor than an Intel Core i3 chip).

Processor Speed
Processor Speed

Speed of the processor can make a significant difference in the overall performance of a computer. It is important to understand how you plan to use the computer. Lower speed processors are sufficient for web browsing, email, and most other text-driven applications. More speed is useful if video streaming or graphics-intensive applications are a priority. Higher speed processors are also preferable for heavy-duty business applications (such as database development) and gaming.

Number of Processor Cores
Number of Processor Cores

The central processing unit (CPU) in your computer is the chip that performs the actual computational work (i.e., running the programs). But one single-core CPU can only perform one task at a time, which is where multi-core CPUs come in.

A dual-core CPU has two central processing units on a single CPU chip, so it appears to the operating system as two CPUs. Similarly, a quad-core CPU has four central processing units, an 8-core CPU has eight central processing units, etc. Having more than a single-core CPU allows multiple programs to run at the same time while allowing your computer stay responsive even when you are multitasking.

Most computers these days have at least dual-core CPUs. However, if you plan on performing CPU-intensive tasks such as video editing/encoding, you may want to consider purchasing a computer with a minimum of a quad-core CPU. Generally speaking, the more cores the CPU has the more expensive the computer will be.

Ethernet Technology
Ethernet Technology

Ethernet is a local area network (LAN) technology. The Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE) created the standard which they call 802.3. An Ethernet LAN typically connects via special grades of copper wires.

Laptops usually have an Ethernet port or ports to connect them to the LAN. The speed of that connection is determined by the type of Ethernet connection used. Those types are:

Ethernet, also known as 10BASE-T, which provides transmission speeds up to 10 Mbps.

Fast Ethernet, or 100BASE-T, provides faster transmission speeds up to 100 megabits per second.

Gigabit Ethernet or 1000BASE-T provides an even faster transmission, at speeds up to 1000 megabits per second (1 gigabit or 1 billion bits per second).

10-Gigabit Ethernet is currently the fastest commercially available version which provides up to 10 billion bits per second.

Wi-Fi Standard
Wi-Fi Standard

WiFi or Wireless LAN (WLAN) standards are compatibility standards developed by the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE). They are also referred to as 802.11 standards.

The current standards are:

802.11a

802.11a supports bandwidth up to 54 Mbps and signals in a regulated frequency spectrum around 5 GHz. Because there is less interference in the 5GHz spectrum, 802.11a is often used in "noisy" electrical environments, such as hospitals. This higher frequency compared to 802.11b shortens the range of 802.11a networks. The higher frequency also means 802.11a signals have more difficulty penetrating walls and other obstructions.

802.11a has a fast maximum speed and its regulated frequencies prevent signal interference from other devices. But 802.11a has a higher cost and a shorter range signal that is more easily obstructed

802.11b

802.11b supports bandwidth up to 11 Mbps, comparable to traditional Ethernet. 802.11b uses the unregulated radio signaling frequency (2.4 GHz) as vendors often prefer using this frequency to lower their production costs. Being unregulated, 802.11b gear can incur interference from microwave ovens, cordless phones, and other appliances using the same 2.4 GHz range. However, by installing 802.11b gear a reasonable distance from other appliances, interference can easily be avoided.

802.11b provides for the lowest cost, a good signal range, and it is not easily obstructed by walls, ceilings, etc. But it also has the slowest maximum speed of any of the 802.11 standards and home appliances may interfere with it.

802.11g

802.11g supports bandwidth up to 54 Mbps and it uses the 2.4 GHz frequency for greater range. 802.11g is also backwards compatible with 802.11b, meaning that 802.11g access points will work with 802.11b wireless network adapters and vice versa.

802.11g has a fast maximum speed with good signal range that is not easily obstructed.
But 802.11g costs more than 802.11b and appliances may interfere with it.

802.11n

802.11n, also called "Wireless N", supports up to 300 Mbps of network bandwidth. 802.11n also offers somewhat better range over earlier WiFi standards due to its increased signal intensity, and it is backward-compatible with 802.11b/g gear. It increases the amount of bandwidth supported by utilizing multiple wireless signals and antennas (called MIMO technology) instead of one.

802.11n has a faster maximum speed and best signal range. It is also more resistant to signal interference from outside sources. But it costs more than 802.11g and its use of multiple signals may interfere with nearby 802.11b/g based networks.

802.11ac

802.11ac is the newest generation of WiFi signaling in popular use. Its network bandwidth is rated up to 1300 Mbps on the 5 GHz band plus up to 450 Mbps on 2.4 GHz. 802.11ac utilizes dual band wireless technology, supporting simultaneous connections on both the 2.4 GHz and 5 GHz WiFi bands. 802.11ac offers backward compatibility to 802.11b/g/n.

802.11ac has a fastest maximum speed and best signal range. It costs more than 802.11n and its use of multiple signals and dual frequencies may interfere with nearby 802.11a/b/g/n based networks.

Optical Drive Type
Optical Drive Type

An optical drive uses a laser light to read data from or write data to an optical disc. Optical disc types include CDs, DVDs, and Blu-ray discs. An optical drive allows you to play music or watch movies from pre-recorded discs. Computer software applications also often come on CDs or DVDs, so you need an optical drive to install the software from the disc. Most modern drives also allow you to write to an empty disc, so you can create your own music CDs, transfer movies on your hard drive to a disc, or create a backup copy of important data.

When a optical drive is listed as a hybrid drive, it means that it can read and/or write to more than one type of disc (for example, a drive that can read both DVDs and Blu-rays discs). Drives that are labeled ROM can only read optical discs. Drives that can also write to a disc are labeled RW (for Read/Write).

Number of LAN (RJ-45) Ports
Number of LAN (RJ-45) Ports

Number of HDMI Ports
Number of HDMI Ports

HDMI (which stands for High-Definition Multimedia Interface) is an audio/video interface standard. HDMI is used to transfer uncompressed digital video data and compressed/uncompressed digital audio data from one HDMI-compliant device to another. The HDMI port on a computer is typically used to connect the computer to a monitor, television, or digital audio device.

HD Type
HD Type

HD Type refers to the image resolution of a monitor or TV capable of handling a High Definition signal.

HD (sometimes referred to as HD Ready) displays can handle a HD signal but have an image resolution of 1,280 x 720 (also referred to as 720p), which is not a true high definition image. HD displays have a pixel count of approximately 1 million total pixels.

Full HD displays have an image resolution of 1,920 x 1,080 pixels (also referred to as 1080p), which is the lowest resolution capable of displaying a true high definition image. Full HD displays have a pixel count of approximately 2 million total pixels, twice that of HD Ready displays.

4 K Ultra HD displays have an image resolution of 3,840 x 2,160 pixels, for a pixel count of approximately 8 million total pixels. The image resolution of a 4 K Ultra HD display is four times that of Full HD.

5 K Ultra HD displays have an image resolution of 5120 × 2880, which is approximately 14.7 million total pixels (just over seven times as many pixels as 1080p Full HD).

Wide Quad HD is four times the image resolution of standard 720p HD. This means you can fit the same number of pixels as four HD displays into a Wide Quad HD display of the same size. This results in an image resolution of 2,560x1,440 pixels (also referred to as 1440p).

Bluetooth
Bluetooth

Bluetooth is a wireless communication protocol for connecting devices through the air. Although it's slower than Wi-Fi, it is often simpler to set up and it's generally preferred for device-to-device transfers. Two Bluetooth-enabled devices could be used to send and receive files wirelessly via the Bluetooth connection. To make two Bluetooth devices work together, you have to "pair" them. Pairing devices simply means you make them discoverable so that their Bluetooth radios can see each other.

In addition to sharing files over a Bluetooth connection, Bluetooth can also be used to connect your computer, tablet, or smartphone to a peripheral device. For example, you could pair a Bluetooth keyboard with your tablet or pair a Bluetooth headset with your smartphone. These days just about every tablet and smartphone supports Bluetooth, so it's become the default way for connecting to speakers, headphones, keyboards, and other devices without using a wired connection.

Color
Color

Color refers to the color of the computer's exterior casing. Often the keyboard (and sometimes the bezel surrounding the screen) are black regardless of the color of the computer's casing. For most business users, color is of less concern than screen size and processing power. Black, silver, and white are by far the most common and widely-available colors. However, computers targeted for home or student use are often available in a variety of colors.

Height
Height

Height is the measured distance from the bottom (base) of a device to its upper-most point. Dimensions such as height, width, and depth are most important when the device needs to fit in a limited or pre-defined area. Height is normally published in inches. However, in countries that use the metric system (such as most European countries and India), heights are sometimes specified in centimeters. To convert centimeters into inches divide the centimeter value by 2.54.

Width
Width

Width is the measured distance from the left-most point of a device to its right-most point. Dimensions such as height, width, and depth are most important when the device needs to fit in a limited or pre-defined area. Width is normally published in inches. However, in countries that use the metric system (such as most European countries and India), widths are sometimes specified in centimeters. To convert centimeters into inches divide the centimeter value by 2.54.

Depth
Depth

Depth is the measured distance from the front-most point of a device to its rear-most point. Dimensions such as height, width, and depth are most important when the device needs to fit in a limited or pre-defined area. Depth is normally published in inches. However, in countries that use the metric system (such as most European countries and India), depths are sometimes specified in centimeters. To convert centimeters into inches divide the centimeter value by 2.54.

Energy Star Certified
Energy Star Certified

Energy Star is a voluntary standard for energy efficient consumer products that originated in the United States in 1992. Since then, Australia, Canada, Japan, New Zealand, Taiwan, and the European Union have adopted the program.

It was created to help businesses and individuals save money and protect our climate through superior energy efficiency. Although it began as a way to cut down on the energy drain from computers, it now covers more than 50 product categories. Devices that carry the Energy Star service mark generally use 20–30% less energy than required by U.S. federal standards.

For more information on the Green movement, be sure to visit our Go Green guide here.

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